ABOUT You will no dount arrive in Suriname by plane landing at Johan Adolf Pengel International Airport. From there you can take the taxi or bus into town. A taxi (if private one) will cost around 80SRD. However, prices will vary between drivers. Make sure to arrange and set a price with the driver before going anywhere. There are no trains in Suriname. Travelling by car is safe Guyana has road access to Suriname. In Guyana, Georgetown inquire in for mini-buses traveling to Suriname. Note that entering Suriname, Nieuw Nickerie by water travel from in Guyana is illegal. Buses leave Georgetown for the Surinamese border daily. Ask for Berbice car park. In the west(Guyana-Suriname border) there's a regular river ferry between Guyana and Suriname. There's a possibility of traveling from French Guiana by car there a small car ferry between Suriname and Guyana. In the east there are small boats and small ferry between Albina (Suriname) and St. Laurent (French Guiana). You can take the bus from Albina (bordering French Guiana) to Paramaribo. From Georgetown, Guyana, take mini bus #63a to Molson Creek in eastern Guyana just across the river from Suriname. The trip takes at least 3 hrs. From there, you will go through customs on the Guyanese side. Then take the 11am daily ferry across the river to South Drain. The actual ferry ride takes about 30 minutes. Since not many tourists visit Suriname yet and the inner-land is not within easy reach, the expenses of travel are higher than you might expect. Tourist attractions can be more expensive than in Europe. With almost a third of the country being declared national reserves, Suriname's main tourist attraction are its vast natural lands and the diversity of flora and fauna in them. Head to the beaches of Galibi and Albina to witness the impressive breeding process of large Leatherback sea turtles, or book a helicopter ride to one of the more remote beaches to see the same, with fewer people around. Spot river dolphins on the way and see the typical mangrove forests between the ocean and the rain forests. The Amazon rain forests cover most of the Surinam surface and is home to thousands of birds, reptiles, monkeys and even a handful of jaguars. As tourism develops, guided tours and resorts in the heart of the jungle are popping up and make a comfortable option if you want to spend a few days spotting wildlife or plants, including the rubber tree, spike-footed palms, plenty of orchids and cactusses. Daytrips are an option too. The Central Suriname Nature Reserve is the most popular of the reserves and is home to the Raleigh waterfalls and mount Voltzberg. Brownsberg Nature Park is home to one of the largest man-made lakes in the world, the Brokopondo Reservoir. Visit Tonka Island to see the eco-tourism project that Saramaccaner Maroons have set up there.

CLIMATE Tropical; moderated by trade winds; yearly rain average 2200 mm. There are 2 dry seasons February to March, August to November and 2 rainy seasons December to January, April to August. November is the generally the hottest month.

BEWARE Burglary, armed robbery and violent crime occur in Paramaribo and surrounding areas. Pick pocketing and robbery are increasingly common in the major business and shopping districts in the capital. You should avoid wearing expensive jewellery or displaying large amounts of money in public. Keep valuables like your passport, tickets, driving licence and travellers' cheques secure and keep photocopies of these documents in a separate place. Avoid remote and secluded areas, quiet streets and quiet parks. Avoid the Palm Garden (Palmentium) area in Paramaribo at night. Apart from the entertainment centre around the Torarica Hotel, you should avoid walking at night anywhere in the city. Travel in the interior of the country is generally trouble-free, although there have been reports of tourists being robbed. Use a well-established tour company if you intend to travel to these parts of Suriname.