ABOUT Stretching out on two continents, Turkey is a paradise where one can experience the four seasons simultaneously. Whether be fond of art, history, archeology or nature, you will feel the happiness beyond desires and hopes during your stay in Turkey. Surrounded by the crystal clear waters of a shinning sea at four directions, Turkey generously offers her 8000km long shores before your eyes. Turkey is rich in flora and fauna. Because of its geographical location, the mainland, Anatolia, has witnessed the mass migration of diverse peoples shaping the course of history. Twenty fascinating civilizations render Turkey the heir of 10.000 years old history, which has still been examined for further ancient secrets to be brought up into daylight. These lands inhales at any moment the mystery of the past through the existence of the statues of gods and goddesses, temples, theaters, agoras, churches, mosques, medresseh, palaces and caravanserais. Becoming a united whole of daily life and all other values, Turkey forms ideal circumstances.

CLIMATE The coastal areas of Turkey bordering the Aegean Sea and the Mediterranean Sea have a temperate Mediterranean climate, with hot, dry summers and mild to cool, wet winters. The coastal areas of Turkey bordering the Black Sea have a temperate Oceanic climate with warm, wet summers and cool to cold, wet winters. The Turkish Black Sea coast receives the greatest amount of precipitation and is the only region of Turkey that receives high precipitation throughout the year. The eastern part of that coast averages 2,500 millimeters annually which is the highest precipitation in the country. Conditions can be much harsher in the more arid interior. Winters on the plateau are especially severe. Temperatures of −30 °C to −40 °C (−22 °F to −40 °F) can occur in eastern Anatolia, and snow may lie on the ground at least 120 days of the year. In the west, winter temperatures average below 1 °C (34 °F). Summers are hot and dry, with temperatures generally above 30 °C (86 °F) in the day.

BEWARE Since late May 2013, there have been demonstrations in cities across Turkey, some of which have become violent. In Istanbul previous demonstrations have centered on the area around Taksim Square, on Istiklal Street and in the Besiktas and Kadikoy districts. In Ankara, the protests have mainly taken place in the central Kizilay district around the Prime Minister’s office. In Izmir the focus has been in the town centre, near the water front. You should avoid all demonstrations and leave the area if one develops. Generally crime levels are low, but street robbery and pick-pocketing are common in the major tourist areas of Istanbul. Be wary of strangers approaching you offering food and drink (which may be drugged), to change money or to take you to a restaurant or nightclub.